The Chain Bridge of Budapest!

Our year 2019 ended with a visit to an architectural rich city named Budapest of the country Hungary. And the city is beautiful would be an understatement of the year. It is/was and probably always will be magnificent. The festive time of Christmas and New Year emphasised on it grandeur even more.

A very well known Hungarian iconic symbol in Budapest is the Chain Bridge, in the winter of 1820 Count Széchenyi István, a theorist, writer and politician was not able to cross the famous Danube river due to the heavy ice breaking and so he could not attend his father’s funeral. This was the moment when he conceived the idea of building a permanent bridge.  The foundation was laid in 1842 and after 7 years in 1849 was made available to the public. It was a miracle of its time a suspension bridge connecting the two cities Buda and Pest and one of the most significant industrial monuments.

The lions that were placed on either side of the bridge by the sculptor, János Marschalkó who was satisfied with his work until Jakab Frick, a shoemaker apprentice cried out loudly that the lions have no tongue. And the sculptor was mocked so much that he committed suicide by jumping into the Danube, which is not true actually, both the suicide and about the tongue, just a myth which is still circulating around the creation of the bridge.  The original bridge however got destroyed in the World War II by the Nazis in 1945.

Retaining english engineers William Tierney Clark and Adam Clarke’s architecture of building the bridge with only on 2 pillars hanging on huge iron chains and the lions decorating the bridgeheads, the bridge was rebuilt in 1949 which we see today.

We were staying at the Intercontinental Hotel which had the view of the Chain Bridge and The Castle District and we could see it and take in its beauty day and night. So no doubt for us the most photographed and walked upon object of this city was the Chain Bridge!

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